U.S. Army Corps renourishment project to slow erosion on Folly Beach

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers — Charleston District digs up sand from the ocean floor and a pipe shoots the sand onto Folly Beach. (Photo/Liz Segrist)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Charleston District digs up sand from the ocean floor, and a pipe shoots the sand onto Folly Beach. (Photo by Liz Segrist)
By Liz Segrist
lsegrist@scbiznews.com
Published Jan. 22, 2014

The ongoing renourishment project at Folly Beach brings sand from the ocean floor onto the beach to slow erosion and protect the properties and infrastructure along Folly Beach, Project Manager David Warren said.

The erosion is partly natural and partly caused by the jetties around Charleston, Warren said. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Charleston District is heading up the project, which began this weekend and is estimated to take roughly five months to complete.

A dredge three miles off the beach drills into the ocean floor 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The drill digs up sand, which is pumped through a three-mile pipe where it shoots out onto the beach. Bulldozers then smooth over the sand.

The beach renourishment is being conducted as part of a 50-year agreement with the city of Folly Beach. The first renourishment project was in 1993, and the most recent was in 2005.

The $30.7 million contract to complete the beach renourishment was awarded in October to Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company LLC. Folly Beach will share the cost of funding.

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